3 more arrested for human trafficking

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Three more accused in international human trafficking racket were arrested by unit III crime branch on Friday and Saturday. While Pyara Singh Gotara was arrested on Friday, Jarnel Singh Gotara and Rajinder Singh Atwal were picked up on Saturday.

Image result for 3 more arrested for human trafficking tnn | Updated: Jan 28, 2018, 18:34 IS

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The number of arrested accused has now gone up to ten. Police said that 57 youngsters were trafficked from the city to North America, Europe, Haryana, Punjab and Delhi, apart from Maharashtra.

According to police, of the ten arrested, two accused would create fake bona fide and school leaving certificates. The youngsters were trafficked to shops, construction sites, hotels and malls as workers and for driving taxies. So far, 20 trafficked persons have been traced while hunt for other accused and victims is continuing.

Teenager crushed under truck

 Seventeen-year-old Prasanjeet Meshram, a labourer, who was riding pillion on a bike, died on the spot after being hit by an unidentified truck in front of Umiya gate at Kalamna on Saturday.
Prasanjeet was sitting between rider Mukesh Kosare and his cousin Ganesh Bawne when the trio was returning from Bhandara.
All the three fell off after being hit by the truck. Kosare and Bawne sustained minor injuries. However, Prasanjeet succumbed to head injuries.
Kalamna police have registered a case of negligence in driving against the unknown truck driver.

 

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‘Well-oiled network gets 50,000 Bangladeshi girls trafficked into India every year’-Border Security Force Study

Indian_Army-PTI

Published in The Times of India

NEW DELHI: Around 50,000 Bangladeshi girls are trafficked to or through India every year and around 5 lakh Bangladeshi women and children aged 12 to 30 years have been illegally sent to India in the last decade.

Citing data from various reports and estimation of NGOs, a BSF study reveals, human trafficking from Bangladesh to India has grown to such a magnitude that it now works directly on the principle of demand and supply with a well lubricated machinery of touts working on both sides of the border with the first link in the chain being Dhaka.

Farmers harvest paddy near Indo-Bangladesh border in Kamalpur area of Tripura's Dhalai district on May 15, 2014.  Tension prevails in the area after Indian farmers were allegedly prevented from entering their paddy fields by Bangladeshi nationals and Border Guard Bangladesh (BGB) on 14th May, 2014. (Photo: IANS)The human trafficking syndicate operating in various cities/states of India raise their demand to touts in Bangladesh directly or through agents in Kolkata, following which the syndicate based on the other side of border supply the victims. The Indian syndicate demands young girls and women mostly for brothels, low grade hotels for prostitution, dance bars, massage parlours, employment as domestic workers, and forced marriages besides feeding the market for unskilled or semi-skilled labour.

In order to meet targets, BSF says, there is a network of touts in whole of the Bangladesh starting from the capital city Dhaka and further linking to border districts till the last village. There are agents and sub-agents who have contacts with people in border villages. 84% of these touts are male while 16% are female.

Explaining the modus operandi in the study titled “Human Trafficking: Modus Operandi of touts on Indo-Bangladesh border”, BSF says the Bangladeshi syndicate lures people by promising them a better life in India with good jobs, household work, offering work in movies, false promises of marriage other than abducting young girls.

uwzpmoxkza-1491589544The Bangladeshi touts typically look for girls from poor and vulnerable families in Bangladesh. “…….there is so much of poverty in Bangladesh that the touts easily gets their target at bus stands and railway stations across the country,” says BSF. The victims, it says, are mostly Bangladeshi internal migrants.

According to the BSF study, most of the victims are trafficked from Jessore and Satkhira to Gojadanga and Hakimpur in Bangladesh. The border here is completely unfenced and population resides till zero line, making it easier for touts to bring people into India. The Benopole border crossing, known as the south-west transit point, is also most commonly used by the touts as it is the easiest land route to India.

Other districts of Bangladesh – Kurigram, Lalmonnirhat, Nilphamari, Panchagarh, Thakurgaon, Dinajppur, Naogaon, Chapai Nawabganj and Rajshahi are also used for human trafficking, says BSF. “Over a period of time, Bangladeshi touts have built up powerful bases in the border districts and these are now favourite transit points of human trafficking,” it says.

Post trafficking, the victims are kept inside border villages for some time before they are further sent to Indian cities. For this also, there is a well-oiled network of touts. In India, the most favoured destinations are Mumbai, Hyderabad and Bengaluru while other cities preferred by the traffickers include Raipur and Surat.

1200px-Indo_Bangladesh_Border_Gate,_Hilli,_Dakshin_DenajpurThe researchers have recommended focus on border patches which are vulnerable to trafficking, cooperation from Bangladeshi authorities and self-employment projects in India so that border population on India’s side does not indulge in trafficking.

Victims, arrested touts and locals interviewed by BSF for the study claimed that for every person to cross over to India, tout has to pay 200-400 takas (Bangladeshi currency) to the Border Guards Bangladesh (BGB) but BSF’s involvement was not found at organisation level. “Often there were instances of individual involvement (of BSF personnel),” says the study.

Nilphamari-Chilahati_Railway_line

SC glare on Bengal child trafficking

The Telegraph

Supreme Court 

The Supreme Court on Thursday sought a response from all states and Union territories on measures to combat child trafficking, an issue that has pitted Bengal against the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR).

Observing that the future of the country depends on the character and destiny of children, a bench headed by Chief Justice of India Dipak Misra expanded the scope of a special leave petition filed by the national child rights commission and stayed all related proceedings pending before Calcutta High Court.

This includes the high court order passed on August 29, 2017, restraining the national commission from interfering with the issue of child trafficking in Bengal as the state commission was already seized of the issue. “Trafficking of children… has a vital national concern and recognises no boundary. A right of a child in a society is sacred, for the future of the country depends upon the character and the destiny of the child, and the State has a great role in that regard,” the bench, also comprising Justices A.M. Khanwilkar and D.Y. Chandrachud, said in an order directing all states and Union territories to submit their responses.

“There shall be a stay on the impugned order and further proceedings before the high court of Calcutta…. Let the matter be listed on 22nd January, 2018. It shall be taken up at 2pm,” the Supreme Court ordered.

The apex court passed the direction after additional solicitor-general Tushar Mehta and NCPCR counsel Anindita Pujari assailed the Calcutta High Court order on the ground that it was contrary to the law as the national child rights panel was empowered to deal with trafficking in Bengal even if the state child protection commission was seized of the matter.

Mehta told the top court that there was nothing on record to show that the state commission had taken prior cognisance and that the trafficking of children as young as two or three years “is very grave and has acquired a pan-India nature. It has become a cross-border issue, which a state commission cannot address.”

Mehta cited Rule 17 of the NCPCR, which he said gave absolute power to the national commission to deal with any issue pertaining to violation of child rights, even if the matter was pending before a state commission.

He argued that Calcutta High Court had taken an erroneous view that Section 13 of the Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993, bars the jurisdiction of the national commission if any issue relating to child abuse or trafficking is being considered by a state panel.

The apex court said: “Be that as it may, the issue relates to trafficking of children. The submission of the learned additional solicitor-general is that in the state of West Bengal, there has been trafficking of orphans and the children are being sold. As the issue pertains to trafficking of children, which has a vital national concern and recognizes no boundary, we think it appropriate to entertain the special leave petition.”

It said it would also examine certain aspects of the protection of human rights as envisaged under the Protection of Human Rights Act, 1993, as it would “include the dignity of the individual and in that compartment dignity of a child deserves to be covered”.

 

3 Indian,7 Nepalese girls held captive in Kenya rescued: Sushma Swaraj

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NEW DELHI: The government has rescued from Kenya three Indian and seven Nepalese girls, who were victims of an organised crime syndicate that indulged in human trafficking, External Affairs Minister Sushma

Swaraj said on Thursday. The girls have been flown back, the minister said.

In a series of tweets, Swaraj said, “We have rescued three Indian girls from Kenya. The girls were victims

of an organised crime syndicate that indulged in trafficking of girls. Seven Nepalese girls were also rescued. Their Passports and phones were taken and they were held captive in Mombasa.”

Kids among trafficked bonded labourers rescued from Jammu and Kashmir

Greater Kashmir

NCCEBL, a part of Socio-Legal Information Centre (SLIC), Human Rights Network (HRLN) New Delhi, in coordination with the district authorities, raided illegal brick kilns operating in Reasi and Samba districts and rescued illegally trafficked bonded labourers, said a statement.

Watch: Kids among trafficked bonded labourers rescued from Jammu and Kashmir

Kids among trafficked bonded labourers rescued from Jammu and Kashmir

A team of National Campaign Committee for Eradication of Bonded Labour (NCCEBL) has rescued bonded labourers, including kids, from Reasi and Samba districts of Jammu and Kashmir.

NCCEBL, a part of Socio-Legal Information Centre (SLIC), Human Rights Network (HRLN) New Delhi, in coordination with the district authorities, raided illegal brick kilns operating in Reasi and Samba districts and rescued illegally trafficked bonded labourers, said a statement.

“These bonded labourers were trafficked from Chhattisgarh by an agent who promised them work and later made them do forced work for contractors operating brick kilns in Anantnag District of Jammu & Kashmir,” it said.

The statement said that these labourers were made to work for 18 hours altogether without proper meals and any wages.

“Even small children were not spared and were made to do work at brick kiln at Bhagwati Brick Kiln in Reasi  and some of them contracted diseases due to lack of any basic amenity. Earlier many of them suffered chest related ailments as they couldn’t bear shivering cold in Kashmir,” it said.

The labourers, it said, were beaten to pulp by the goons of the agent and transported from Anantnag to Reasi and Samba districts after they protested.

“Many of the women bonded labourers were in family ways giving birth braving death as medical avenues were next to impossible and they had not a single penny to spend on themselves,” said the statement.

It added that their rehabilitation was a challenge due to lack of proper mechanisms in India to provide rehabilitation to rescued bonded laboureres.

“Bonded Labour System (Abolition) Act, 1976 does assure same but implementation remains a tough challenge,” it said.

Convener NCCEBL, Nirmal Gorana said: “Thousands of bonded labourers are still doing forced labour in Jammu & Kashmir and there is no mechanism in place for their repatriation and rehabilitation.”

“There is a need to bust this illegal trafficking racket of bonded labourers which includes women and to break this vicious cycle of trafficking and forced labour where agents on allurement of promising work carry these labourers from State to State,” he added.

Pertinently, the United Nations, in a recent report on slavery, highlighted the stark reality of 40 million slaves in India. 25 million among these include forced labour.

Bihar’s child bazaar: 2,000 kids trafficked annually

The Asian Age

Once the child is handed over to members of these gangs, which pose as placement agencies, there is no end to their exploitation.
Victims of trafficking being brought back from other states to Bihar by NGO activists.

Victims of trafficking being brought back from other states to Bihar by NGO activists.

There has been a steady increase in cases of child trafficking in Bihar, a fact accepted by the Nitish Kumar government which has launched a special drive to combat the menace which is suspected to be impacting 2,000 children every year.

Activists who have been fighting against trafficking claim that victims, including girls under the age of 18, from poor families are being pushed into slavery, prostitution and surrogacy by agents who manage to mislead poor parents with their lucrative offers of getting their children good jobs.

Once the child is handed over to members of these gangs, which pose as placement agencies, there is no end to their exploitation.

Government sources said that directions for a focussed drive against child trafficking came after activists involved in rescue operations demanded immediate action to stop the surge in such cases.

Statistics cited by Human Liberty Network — a social group involved in rescue and rehabilitation work — showed that 2,000 children disappear from the state every year.

In April, senior BJP leader Nand Kishore Yadav, who was then in Opposition, had raised a question in the state Assembly claiming that over 572 children had gone missing from various locations in Patna district in last one year.

However, not all missMr Yadav, who is now a senior minister in Nitish Kumar’s Cabinet, had cited National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) data to point out that cases related to human trafficking in Bihar had increased in past few years.

“After I raised the issue in the state Assembly, several persons who have been involved in the racket were arrested, most of them were from Uttar Pradesh,” he said.

NCRB data shows that in 2015, 332 cases of child trafficking were registered in Bihar, the third highest in the country. Assam registered 1,317 cases and West Bengal had 1,119 cases.

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Reports suggest that in 2017, around 160 persons involved in child trafficking were arrested by Sashastra Seema Bal (SSB) personnel on the Indo-Nepal border. Around 560 children were also rescued.

SSB personnel during their operation in 2016 had arrested 136 persons from border areas. These included 89 from Bihar and 47 from Nepal. Altogether 824 children, including girls, were rescued during this period.

According to an assessment, minor girls and women are the main targets of immoral trafficking in Bihar. Activists involved in combating child trafficking in the state recently claimed that 6,000 children from various parts of the country have been rescued in last couple of years.

“Areas surrounding Nepal border are highly sensitive. It is tough to rescue girls as they are often pushed into flesh trade by traffickers. We also found that underage boys were mostly sold to bangle and carpet factory owners outside the state and are forced into bonded labour,” activist Suresh Kumar told this newspaper.

Giving an account of an incident which occurred a few months ago, Mr Kumar said that a teenage girl from Patna was pushed into  prostitution by people who posed as placement agents.

“We later came to know that the girl was taken to Uttar Pradesh and probably pushed into prostitution. Despite all our efforts, we couldn’t trace the whereabouts of the girl,” Mr Kumar said.

In another incident, a 12-year-old girl from Nawada was sold to UP-based traffickers by her own maternal grandmother and aunt for `12,000. The girl was later rescued by a group called Tatwasi Samaj Nyas which also helped the police  arrest people who were behind the racket.

According to a recent report, a majority of victims are from Patna, Gaya, Nalanda, Nawada, East and West Champaran, Sitamarhi, Darbhanga, Madhubani, Samastipur, Madhepura, Supaul and Kishanganj.

Child rights organisations working to prevent such cases are of the view that the surge in immoral trafficking is also linked to pushing the victims into “forced surrogacy”, an emerging money spinner.

Earlier a group working against girl trafficking had rescued several victims out of whom four complained of being used as “surrogate mothers”.

Talking to this newspaper about the issue, an activist working with Human Liberty Network said, “Surrogacy racket is booming in the country. Young girls between the age of 17 and 20 are being pushed into the bearing children for others,” said the activist who helped rescue and rehabilitate nearly half a dozen such girls.

Rani Hong

Rani Hong

A Role model
Tronie Foundation CEO Rani Hong, a survivor of child trafficking, is a role model for all rescued children. She had earlier met Bihar government officials to launch a campaign against gangs who work as touts and exploit people, especially daily wage earners in rural areas and their children.

“I strongly believe that we need to stand up and if we can do that as a nation then we can drastically reduce, even prevent child trafficking. I want to work with the Government of India and launch a massive campaign against trafficking and slavery,” said Ms Hong.

Ms Hong was pushed into the slavery when she was just six years of age. She was kidnapped from Kerala and taken to Canada before being rescued. “I was tortured and treated like a slave and later abandoned as a destitue,” she said.

Ms Hong and her husband run special awareness drives in 20 countries, including India, through her US-based foundation. Till 2016, she served as special advisor, human trafficking, for the UN.

Godman running trafficking racket: DCW after rescuing 2 girls from Delhi ashram

The girls were confined illegally at an ashram run by spiritual leader Virender Dev Dixit in Karawal Nagar.
DCW chief Swati Maliwal has demanded a CBI probe into ‘human trafficking racket’ being run by Virender Dev Dixit. (Photo: PTI/File)

DCW chief Swati Maliwal has demanded a CBI probe into ‘human trafficking racket’ being run by Virender Dev Dixit.

Two girls were on Tuesday rescued from illegal confinement at an ashram run by spiritual leader Virender Dev Dixit in Karawal Nagar in a joint operation by the police and Delhi Commission for Women (DCW), officials said.

Some literature was also confiscated from the ashram where the girls were  confined, as crackdown continued on the controversial spiritual leader’s premises, they said.

DCW chief Swati Maliwal along with Ajay Verma, advocate appointed as amicus curae by the Delhi High Court, had visited the centre at Karawal Nagar on Monday. They found six women, including the two minors, living in confinement there.

Maliwal, who visited another centre run by Dixit at Nangloi on Monday, demanded a CBI probe into what she suspected was a human trafficking racket being run by him.

“It appears that Baba Virender Dev Dixit is running a human trafficking racket. The CBI should urgently and simultaneously conduct raids at all ashrams of Dixit across India and close them down. By delaying the raids, he is getting time to cover up his action,” she had said.

On December 23, the DCW along with the Delhi Police raided Dixit’s ashram in Mohan garden area of Uttam Nagar and found 25 women confined there.

The issue had come to light due to a PIL filed by an NGO Foundation for Social Empowerment before the Delhi High Court.

The NGO had informed the court that several minors and women were allegedly being illegally confined there.