Young woman and toddler daughter sold for Rs 2 lakh, two people arrested

Handcuffs

Image for representational purpose only

A 28-year-old woman and her three-year-old daughter were allegedly sold in a human trafficking racket which originated from a flower shop near a Bhopal temple, discovered the police.

While the woman was sold for Rs 1.5 lakh to a 55-year-old widower farmer Sumer Gurjar in the dense forests of Malawar, her daughter was sold for Rs 50,000 to a beggar Gangaram (35) in the neighbouring Vidisha district, said the police.

The flower seller was allegedly paid an advance of Rs 10,000 by Gurjar and the remaining Rs 40,000 was to be paid in ten monthly instalments of Rs 4,000 each, claimed the police.

After being trafficked, the woman was imprisoned by Gurjar in a room, where he allegedly routinely raped her and forced her to work as labourer in agricultural fields under watchful eyes of armed guards.

The woman is a native of Khandwa district (280 km from Bhopal) and had been living with her daughter and maternal aunt in the Mother India Colony since being divorced by her husband four years ago. She used to earn a living working as daily wage labourer and also used to beg at railway stations, places of worship and traffic signals.

The incident came to light when the woman’s sister recently reported to Shahjahanabad police that her sister and toddler niece had been missing since August 2017. The subsequent probe led the police to flower seller Ranjit, who upon thorough interrogation allegedly confessed knowing the woman through a friend.

Additional SP (ASP-Bhopal Zone) Rajesh Bhadouria told the New Indian Express, “Two of the five accused include Ranjit, who runs a flower shop near the Kali Temple in Bhopal’s Talaiya area and the beggar Gangaram to whom the toddler girl was sold. It’s also suspected that Gangaram’s live-in partner in Vidisha district could have been trafficked from Rajasthan.

“Entire operation by six teams of city police which included female cops started on Thursday and spanned over 72 hours. Three remaining accused, including rich farmer Sumer Gurjar and his father and the middleman in Bhopal identified as Shanu are yet to be arrested,” he added.

The accused, including the arrested duo, have been booked under IPC Sections 363A (kidnapping or maiming a minor for begging), 366 (kidnapping or inducing a woman to compel marriage, etc), 376 (rape) and 370 (human trafficking).

According to the Crime in India 2016, a report released by the National Crime Record Bureau (NCRB), a total of 51 cases of human trafficking were reported in MP during 2016. A total 120 persons (66 males and 54 females) were trafficked, out of which 97 were aged below 18 years (62 males and 32 females) and 23 aged above 18 years (4 males and 19 females). Also, total 4817 victims (1595 males and 3222 females) were rescued from traffickers.

Advertisements

India’s first anti-trafficking bill likely to get cabinet nod soon

Logo

In a first, the draft bill piloted by the Union women and child development ministry treats a trafficked person who gets into prostitution as a victim rather than offender.
The draft bill also recommends the creation of an anti-trafficking fund and new identities for victims.

The draft bill also recommends the creation of an anti-trafficking fund and new identities for victims.(Getty Images/Vetta)

The Union cabinet could soon consider and approve the country’s first anti-human-trafficking law, according to a senior government official familiar with the matter.

The law, two years in the making, proposes punishment of up to 14 years for traffickers, measures to rehabilitate victims, and the mandatory registration of placement agencies that recruit and place domestic helps, said the official who asked not to be identified.

In a first, the draft Trafficking of Persons (Prevention, Protection and Rehabilitation) Bill, 2017, piloted by the Union women and child development (WCD) ministry, treats a trafficked person who gets into prostitution as a victim rather than offender.

In the existing law, there is no distinction between the trafficked person and the trafficker. Both are treated as criminals, punishable with jail terms of up to seven years.

The draft bill also recommends the creation of an anti-trafficking fund and new identities for victims.

Around 8,100 cases of trafficking were recorded in India in 2016, according to the National Crime Records Bureau. The data show around 23,000 victims of trafficking were rescued that year.

Experts say that’s just the tip of the iceberg, with the actual numbers of people trafficked being much higher.

The proposed bill was held up over objections of the Union home ministry to a separate law on trafficking. The ministry wanted to amend the existing provisions of the Indian Penal Code to address trafficking cases.

However, the home ministry finally conceded to a separate law after the WCD ministry agreed to its demand to allow investigating agencies such as the Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) to investigate trafficking cases.

In an earlier version of the draft, the WCD ministry had proposed the creation of a new agency to handle trafficking cases. The home ministry argued against this on the grounds that existing agencies are well equipped to handle such cases, which often involve money laundering and are sometimes related to terrorism.

“The WCD ministry has agreed to our proposal to allow existing agencies to probe trafficking cases. We are fine with a separate law,” said a senior home ministry official who didn’t wish to be named.

The draft law also makes giving hormones and drugs to trafficked young girls to accelerate sexual maturity and forcing them into prostitution a crime, punishable by up to 10 years in jail and a fine of Rs 1 lakh.

It also proposes to make registration of placement agencies that recruit and place domestic helps mandatory. Failure to register with the state authorities will invite a fine of Rs 50,000.

Currently, there is no single law dealing with human trafficking and the crime is covered under different acts administered by at least half-a-dozen ministries, including WCD, home, labour, health, Indian overseas affairs and external affairs. More often than not, this results in lax enforcement.

Police Raid Brothel, Find Man’s Skeleton Dumped By Racket Queen 13 Years Ago

The police arrested the woman, Sarita Bharti, 37, under the Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act for running a prostitution racket, and rescued four women on December 4 from her house in Dandipada in Boisar

The police in Maharashtra’s Boisar have recovered the skeleton of a man from a water closet (WC) inside a brothel owned by a woman.

Deputy superintendent of police Fatesingh Patil said the police arrested the woman, Sarita Bharti, 37, under the Immoral Traffic (Prevention) Act for running a prostitution racket, and rescued four women on December 4 from her house in Dandipada in Boisar.

During the probe, the police learnt that she had killed her husband Sahdeo Bharti 13 years ago, and buried the body in the same house.

“On Tuesday night, we have received information that Sarita is not only involved in the sex racket, but she had also killed several people, including her husband,” said senior inspector Kiran Kabadi from Boisar police station told Mid-Day.

When a police team dug up the floor of the house, they found a skeleton inside a pit, reported PTI. It was sent to forensic laboratory for examination.

Sarita further revealed that she killed her husband by hitting him on the head while he was asleep. The reason behind the murder is not clear yet. Our investigations are on,” Kabadi added.

 

Humanity above religion and guidelines to curb child trafficking

Related image

Image result for uttarakhand high court

Representational Image 

Uttrakhand HC: Conduct DNA test of child beggars and their parents to prevent child trafficking
The Uttrakhand High Court reversed a trial court’s order and convicted a 30-year-old man on charges of kidnapping and sexually assaulting a minor girl.

The court held him guilty for luring a 15-year-old Nepali girl on the pretext of taking her on a shopping trip to Banbasa in Uttarakhand. The minor girl was then subjected to sexual harassment by the man during their travel, the court held. The man was arrested after a sub-inspector at Shadra Bairaj police station was tipped off about the crime.

While delivering the judgment, the high court passed certain directions for the State to curb human trafficking:

  • Police should verify identity documents of all minor girls coming from Nepal and take contact numbers of their guardians in India and Nepal.
  • Police should book human traffickers under the Money Laundering Act and attach their properties. The police should increase patrolling on borders and human trafficking units should be headed by officers not below the rank of DSP/CO.
  • Since minors are kidnapped and made to beg in India, police should conduct DNA test of the child beggars and people claiming to be their parents. It further directed a ban on begging in the State.
  • State government should constitute a separate wing and set up a photo bank data to trace missing boys and girls, the photo bank should be displayed on the state department’s website and should flashed at bus depots and railway stations by the police.

New born sold for Rs. 50000, human traffickers are active in the second capital of Maharashtra

india samvad hindi

The incident goes like this, accused approached one Mona Barsagade, 26, a resident of Wadi area through a lady mediator Bharati
new born sold for rs 50000 human traffickers are active in the second capital of maharashtra

Representative Image by @Ashok_Trivedi

Dhantoli police had apprended a couple named Manish Mundada,36 and his wife Harsha Mundada,32 for allegedly buying out a 12 day old girl child from her poor mother on assurance of paying her Rs. 50000. After registering the complaint in appropriate sections, the police had arrested the couple and produced them in the court. The court had sanctioned 2 days remand for their custodial interrogation to the police. The arrest had raised qualm, that some human trafficking gang is active in the city. A senior police official revealed that we are investigating the matter from all possible angles.

The incident goes like this, accused approached one Mona Barsagade, 26, a resident of Wadi area through a lady mediator Bharati. Mona was blessed with one son, her husband is doing some business. During her second pregnancy, she had gone to a private hospital near law college square for treatment. The couple lured her to give her child to them and offered her to pay an amount of Rs. 50000. After the couple persuaded him, Mona agreed to it. On November 22, she delivered a girl child and handed over the child to the couple, against a payment of Rs.50000. After some time she started realising her mistake. She approached the couple for getting her daughter back.

When the couple refused, she lodged a complaint with the police. Acting on the complaint the cops arrested the couple from their residence at Senapati Nagar, Dighori. The couple claimed that this is a case of surrogacy and that they are running a surrogacy centre. However they could not produce relevant documents to justify their claim. Police also suspect for the involvement of the couple in an inter state human trafficking racket.

 

Children raped, burnt into submission in Indian brothels – report

Image result for thomson reuters foundation news logo

"Fifty-five percent of the survivors were beaten with objects and some were forced to witness murder of other minors. These are extremely violent and cruel methods."
1376393_777669055638093_7814329154572425656_n

Representational Image

The brutal “breaking in” of trafficked girls in Indian brothels, from rape to beatings to starvation, leaves girls unable to say “no to anyone” or escape, a new study has found.

The testimonies of child sex trafficking survivors in the eastern Indian city of Kolkata offer a glimpse into the violence young girls endure before they are pushed into the sex trade.

“Traffickers are using the tactic of a ‘conditioning period’ to break the resilience of children,” said Saji Philip of the charity International Justice Mission, which co-authored the study with the government of West Bengal state.

“Fifty-five percent of the survivors were beaten with objects and some were forced to witness murder of other minors. These are extremely violent and cruel methods.”

The report into the prevalence of commercial sexual exploitation of children in Kolkata found more than half of the survivors had undergone a breaking in period involving being raped by the first customer, threats and physical violence.

West Bengal, with Kolkata as its capital, accounted for 44 percent of human trafficking cases reported in 2016 and also had the most missing children reports, according to government data.

Based on interviews with survivors, researchers said some had been beaten over a period of two weeks and burned with cigarettes, some were kept in isolation, while one was locked in a room without food for 12 days.

In addition to conditioning periods, managers used debt bondage to force survivors to enter the sex trade, said the report, published last week.

Managers told about half of the survivors that they had been sold and could not leave until they had repaid the money.

Others were told they owed the hosts who fed, clothed and housed them during sometimes months-long periods before they were forced into the sex trade, having been lured on the promise that they would be placed in well-paid jobs.

Once they had been “broken in”, survivors reported providing services to seven to 18 clients a day.

“They (managers) said not to go against the customer’s word – to let them have pleasure and not to express our pain,” said one teenager from West Bengal interviewed for the report.

“If they’re pleased, they would pay more.”

Child sex trafficking victims being raped, burned and starved in India’s brothels, report concludes

Image result for independent logo

Young girls in Kolkata being forced into prostitution by 'extremely violent and cruel methods', investigation by International Justice Mission concludes

Indian citizens demonstrating against child sexual abuse in Hyderbad in 2014 AFP/Getty Images

The brutal “breaking in” of trafficked girls in Indian brothels, from rape to beatings to starvation, leaves girls unable to say “no to anyone” or escape, a new study has found.

The testimonies of child sex trafficking survivors in the eastern Indian city of Kolkata offer a glimpse into the violence young girls endure before they are pushed into the sex trade.

“Traffickers are using the tactic of a ‘conditioning period’ to break the resilience of children,” said Saji Philip of the charity International Justice Mission, which co-authored the study with the government of West Bengal state.

“Fifty-five percent of the survivors were beaten with objects and some were forced to witness murder of other minors. These are extremely violent and cruel methods.”

The report into the prevalence of commercial sexual exploitation of children in Kolkata found more than half of the survivors had undergone a breaking in period involving being raped by the first customer, threats and physical violence.

West Bengal, with Kolkata as its capital, accounted for 44 percent of human trafficking cases reported in 2016 and also had the most missing children reports, according to government data.

Based on interviews with survivors, researchers said some had been beaten over a period of two weeks and burned with cigarettes, some were kept in isolation, while one was locked in a room without food for 12 days.

In addition to conditioning periods, managers used debt bondage to force survivors to enter the sex trade, said the report, published last week.

Managers told about half of the survivors that they had been sold and could not leave until they had repaid the money.

Others were told they owed the hosts who fed, clothed and housed them during sometimes months-long periods before they were forced into the sex trade, having been lured on the promise that they would be placed in well-paid jobs.

Once they had been “broken in”, survivors reported providing services to seven to 18 clients a day.

“They (managers) said not to go against the customer’s word – to let them have pleasure and not to express our pain,” said one teenager from West Bengal interviewed for the report.

“If they’re pleased, they would pay more.”