New born sold for Rs. 50000, human traffickers are active in the second capital of Maharashtra

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The incident goes like this, accused approached one Mona Barsagade, 26, a resident of Wadi area through a lady mediator Bharati
new born sold for rs 50000 human traffickers are active in the second capital of maharashtra

Representative Image by @Ashok_Trivedi

Dhantoli police had apprended a couple named Manish Mundada,36 and his wife Harsha Mundada,32 for allegedly buying out a 12 day old girl child from her poor mother on assurance of paying her Rs. 50000. After registering the complaint in appropriate sections, the police had arrested the couple and produced them in the court. The court had sanctioned 2 days remand for their custodial interrogation to the police. The arrest had raised qualm, that some human trafficking gang is active in the city. A senior police official revealed that we are investigating the matter from all possible angles.

The incident goes like this, accused approached one Mona Barsagade, 26, a resident of Wadi area through a lady mediator Bharati. Mona was blessed with one son, her husband is doing some business. During her second pregnancy, she had gone to a private hospital near law college square for treatment. The couple lured her to give her child to them and offered her to pay an amount of Rs. 50000. After the couple persuaded him, Mona agreed to it. On November 22, she delivered a girl child and handed over the child to the couple, against a payment of Rs.50000. After some time she started realising her mistake. She approached the couple for getting her daughter back.

When the couple refused, she lodged a complaint with the police. Acting on the complaint the cops arrested the couple from their residence at Senapati Nagar, Dighori. The couple claimed that this is a case of surrogacy and that they are running a surrogacy centre. However they could not produce relevant documents to justify their claim. Police also suspect for the involvement of the couple in an inter state human trafficking racket.

 

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Two Bangladeshis arrested near Mumbai for sex trafficking of a minor

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The girl was allegedly in a relationship with one of the accused and was brought to India on the promise of marriage
She was forced into prostitution and raped repeatedly.

She was forced into prostitution and raped repeatedly.(File pic for representation)

Two Bangladeshi men were arrested by the Thane antihuman trafficking cell on Wednesday for allegedly kidnapping a 16-year-old girl from the neighbouring country and raping her over a month. The accused — Liyan alias Saurabh Noor Islam Mulla, 20, and his uncle, Shohag Mohammed Shabib Islam, 25 — were remanded in police custody till December 12.

According to the police, the girl was kept in a rented house in Bangalore and was brought to Thane on the pretext that she was being sent back to Bangladesh.

The girl was allegedly in a relationship with Mulla for a year and was brought to India last month on the promise of marriage. A police officer from the Thane station, said “Mulla lured the girl with the promise of marriage. He told her that they would visit Bangalore for a month before getting married. However, after coming to India, she was forced into prostitution and raped repeatedly.”

On a tip-off, the Thane police sent a decoy officer to Mulla who agreed to sell the girl for Rs75,000. Mulla was arrested from Shivaji hospital, Kalwa.

The two have been charged under relevant sections of the POCSO and IPC.

Children raped, burnt into submission in Indian brothels – report

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"Fifty-five percent of the survivors were beaten with objects and some were forced to witness murder of other minors. These are extremely violent and cruel methods."
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The brutal “breaking in” of trafficked girls in Indian brothels, from rape to beatings to starvation, leaves girls unable to say “no to anyone” or escape, a new study has found.

The testimonies of child sex trafficking survivors in the eastern Indian city of Kolkata offer a glimpse into the violence young girls endure before they are pushed into the sex trade.

“Traffickers are using the tactic of a ‘conditioning period’ to break the resilience of children,” said Saji Philip of the charity International Justice Mission, which co-authored the study with the government of West Bengal state.

“Fifty-five percent of the survivors were beaten with objects and some were forced to witness murder of other minors. These are extremely violent and cruel methods.”

The report into the prevalence of commercial sexual exploitation of children in Kolkata found more than half of the survivors had undergone a breaking in period involving being raped by the first customer, threats and physical violence.

West Bengal, with Kolkata as its capital, accounted for 44 percent of human trafficking cases reported in 2016 and also had the most missing children reports, according to government data.

Based on interviews with survivors, researchers said some had been beaten over a period of two weeks and burned with cigarettes, some were kept in isolation, while one was locked in a room without food for 12 days.

In addition to conditioning periods, managers used debt bondage to force survivors to enter the sex trade, said the report, published last week.

Managers told about half of the survivors that they had been sold and could not leave until they had repaid the money.

Others were told they owed the hosts who fed, clothed and housed them during sometimes months-long periods before they were forced into the sex trade, having been lured on the promise that they would be placed in well-paid jobs.

Once they had been “broken in”, survivors reported providing services to seven to 18 clients a day.

“They (managers) said not to go against the customer’s word – to let them have pleasure and not to express our pain,” said one teenager from West Bengal interviewed for the report.

“If they’re pleased, they would pay more.”

Child sex trafficking victims being raped, burned and starved in India’s brothels, report concludes

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Young girls in Kolkata being forced into prostitution by 'extremely violent and cruel methods', investigation by International Justice Mission concludes

Indian citizens demonstrating against child sexual abuse in Hyderbad in 2014 AFP/Getty Images

The brutal “breaking in” of trafficked girls in Indian brothels, from rape to beatings to starvation, leaves girls unable to say “no to anyone” or escape, a new study has found.

The testimonies of child sex trafficking survivors in the eastern Indian city of Kolkata offer a glimpse into the violence young girls endure before they are pushed into the sex trade.

“Traffickers are using the tactic of a ‘conditioning period’ to break the resilience of children,” said Saji Philip of the charity International Justice Mission, which co-authored the study with the government of West Bengal state.

“Fifty-five percent of the survivors were beaten with objects and some were forced to witness murder of other minors. These are extremely violent and cruel methods.”

The report into the prevalence of commercial sexual exploitation of children in Kolkata found more than half of the survivors had undergone a breaking in period involving being raped by the first customer, threats and physical violence.

West Bengal, with Kolkata as its capital, accounted for 44 percent of human trafficking cases reported in 2016 and also had the most missing children reports, according to government data.

Based on interviews with survivors, researchers said some had been beaten over a period of two weeks and burned with cigarettes, some were kept in isolation, while one was locked in a room without food for 12 days.

In addition to conditioning periods, managers used debt bondage to force survivors to enter the sex trade, said the report, published last week.

Managers told about half of the survivors that they had been sold and could not leave until they had repaid the money.

Others were told they owed the hosts who fed, clothed and housed them during sometimes months-long periods before they were forced into the sex trade, having been lured on the promise that they would be placed in well-paid jobs.

Once they had been “broken in”, survivors reported providing services to seven to 18 clients a day.

“They (managers) said not to go against the customer’s word – to let them have pleasure and not to express our pain,” said one teenager from West Bengal interviewed for the report.

“If they’re pleased, they would pay more.”

77.8% of trafficked kids lured into sex trade on job promise: Report

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An estimated 77.8 per cent of the trafficked children are lured into flesh trade at the promise of good job, according to a report
Children shouting Slogans against Child Trafficking on the occation of Global Day Against Child Trafficking at Jantar Mantar on Friday.

Children shouting Slogans against Child Trafficking on the occation of Global Day Against Child Trafficking at Jantar Mantar on Friday.(HT File Photo)

An estimated 77.8 per cent of the trafficked children are lured into flesh trade at the promise of good job, according to a report

The report, compiled by West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights in collaboration with the International Justice Mission (IJM), said the children were subjected to brutal physical violence during conditioning period of the trade which also involved multiple rapes.

The report was released yesterday after on-field study in 2015-16 in the city and neighbourhood areas said.

“Once conditioned, these children were forced to provide sexual ‘services’ to 7-18 men in a day,” the report said.

An estimated 4.4 per cent of brothels and hotels in known red light locations, called ‘public establishments’ in the report, have minors sold for sex, the report said.

The overall number of children – both boys and girls – in such places like brothels was no more than 0.8 per cent, the report said.

Children have been put into the age group of 16-17 years.

In places where sex trade is carried out covertly, like residential premises, massage parlours and lodges, a higher number of 18 per cent children were engaged in such activities, it said.

Of the 131 sex workers sampled in such private establishments, where the information about flesh trade was known only to the select patrons, the number of children engaged in such trade were 24, the report said.

Regional Director, International Justice Mission, India Sanjay Macwan said after the launch, IJM in collaboration with WBCPCR (West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights) had conducted the survey with all possible help from Kolkata Police and CID.

Member Secretary, West Bengal State Legal Services Authority, Ajoy Kumar Gupta said: “One of the worst form of human trafficking is sex trafficking which is most visible in red light areas and a far greater number of them are women and children.”

The time has come for more inter-state collabration to fight this menace, Macwan said.

Macwan added, West Bengal has made some of the most progressive anti-trafficking efforts in the country.

“The finding of IJM’s study reflect the impact of state government’s iniatiatives, the proactive police effort to deter crime and timely conviction from the judiciary,” he said.

West Bengal Records Highest Number Of Human Trafficking Cases In 2016

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A total of 8,132 cases of human trafficking were reported in the country with West Bengal reporting the highest number of cases (3,579)," said the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) in Delhi today, releasing figures for 2016. That's a 44 per cent share of the national total.
West Bengal Records Highest Number Of Human Trafficking Cases In 2016

A report revealed more minors were involved in the sex trade in private establishments than public ones

From second place to first should be something to celebrate. But not in the case of West Bengal which has recorded the highest number of cases of human trafficking in 2016, replacing Assam which had aced the list for the previous year.

“A total of 8,132 cases of human trafficking were reported in the country with West Bengal reporting the highest number of cases (3,579),” said the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB) in Delhi today, releasing figures for 2016. That’s a 44 per cent share of the national total.

Rajasthan is in second position with 1,422 cases or 17.9 per cent cases in the country.

Sanjay Macwan, Regional Director, International Justice Mission, said, “The increasing numbers could be a reflection of greater reporting of the crime of trafficking because of the state’s efforts to curb it.”

“Trafficking victims are still not coming forward to report the crime, they are still hesitant and stigmatised,” said Vivek Chowdhury, judicial secretary, government of West Bengal, adding, “Our chief minister is very keen to stop the crime and the government is geared to it.”

The NCRB figures came on a day when a report was released in Kolkata on commercial sexual exploitation of children in and around the city and revealed more minors were involved in the sex trade in private establishments – massage parlours, lodges and residential premises — than in public ones, the brothels.

The study was conducted by NGO International Justice Mission (IJM) and West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights (WBCPCR) over the last year in Kolkata, Howrah, North and South 24 Parganas and East Midnapore districts.

4143 sex-workers were documented from 451 public and 131 from 40 private establishments.The prevalence of minors in public establishments is 0.8% while in private ones it was a whopping 18 %. The minors observed in private establishments were 15 to 17 years old, all from West Bengal.

“Another unique observation was that 80% of contacts (pimps, madams, traffickers) in private establishments were females. This is different from the stereotypical notion of male-dominated exploiters and pimps. The ages of these contacts ranged from 16 to 58 years,” the report said.

What lured the minors? 77% of them were promised a good job before they were forced into sex work. Many were surprised to arrive in Kolkata and none of them had any notion that they were being brought into this trade.

The minors were subject to violence — multiple rape, beatings and threats of murder. Three survivors had witnessed murders of other sex workers as a warning against resistance.

Indra Chakraborty, the special superintendent of police dealing with trafficking said the crime was the trip of an iceberg and linked to narcotics and illegal firearms and needed to be treated as such. “The dynamics of trafficking are changing and the dynamics of tackling it need to keep pace,” he said.

From brothels to massage parlours: Study shows shift in trafficking of minors from public to private networks in Kolkata

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"All minors observed were 16 and 17 years old, in Sonagachi and Kapasberia, and originally from mostly West Bengal, with the others from Bangladesh and other Indian states,” says the study
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“In the public establishment study, 4.4% of establishments had minors available for commercial sexual exploitation.The estimated prevalence of minors in these hotspots, was 0.8%,” says the study (Illustration: C R Sasikumar)

There has been a shift in the nature of sex trafficking, especially of minors, from public establishments to more private networks in Kolkata, a study has found. The new findings were released on Thursday in a report by the International Justice Mission (IJM) and the West Bengal Commission for Protection of Child Rights for 2015-16 on “Commercial sexual exploitation of children in Kolkata”.

“It was extremely important that this study be done because it forms a base for future programs. It was also important to document this changing pattern of child sexual abuse. No study had been done for children or women so far. The trade is moving out of traditional brothels and shifting to private apartments — which makes exploitation so much more difficult to detect so we need to be even more vigilant,” said the commission’s chairperson, Ananya Chakrabarti, at the launch.

“In the public establishment study, 4.4% of establishments had minors available for commercial sexual exploitation.The estimated prevalence of minors in these hotspots, was 0.8%. This indicates that brothels and other public establishments have low exploitation of minors, but notably at least one quarter of the minors observed in these establishments openly reported being trafficked, sold, and forced into the trade. All minors observed were 16 and 17 years old, in Sonagachi and Kapasberia, and originally from mostly West Bengal, with the others from Bangladesh and other Indian states,” says the study.

The report states that Kolkata has always been a major source, destination and transit for “commercial sexual exploitation”. There are 29 red light areas in the city. Moreover, the state shares borders with Nepal, Bangladesh, and Bhutan, making it a prime location for trafficking. Though Sonagachi, arguably India’s largest red light district, exists in Kolkata, the trade is shifting, speculates the report, from traditional hotspots towards the “more hidden, privately-networked phenomenon’’.

“The more under-documented finding from this study was the seemingly high number of minors engaged in commercial sexual exploitation’’ through private networks. IJM documented 24 minors (aged between 15 to 17 and from West Bengal) being sold for sex out of a total of 131 commercial sex workers, though this was not a representative sample. These minors were observed mostly in private residences, predominantly in the “south” zone of Kolkata, says the study.

Contacts selling or leading to minors for sex in this private network are mostly women who are 16 to 58 years of age. Recruiters used the promise of good jobs to lure victims. In nearly half of the survivors’ experiences, there was a conditioning period involving threats, rape by the first customer, debt bondage etc. that crippled the survivor’s ability to refuse the manager, says the study.

The study team interviewed 18 survivors who were 18-27 years of age. These survivors, however, had entered the sex trade at ages 12-23 with all but two survivors entering as minors. Recruiters trafficked less than half (8 of 18) of the interviewed survivors from within India. The remaining 10 were trafficked from Bangladesh and Nepal. Seven of these survivors were then forced into the sex industry; and one escaped during the conditioning period and before her first customer. All eight suffered physical abuse during the conditioning period.

Pimps and “madams” operating in private networks face less interference from law enforcement or rights activists. Commercial sexual exploitation has evolved to become a “highly profitable” business, generating over 99 billion dollars in 2014. Within India, girls are mainly sourced from Andhra Pradesh, Bihar, Madhya Pradesh, West Bengal, Karnataka, Tamil Nadu, Maharashtra, and UP. Much of the purchasing of minors takes place in West Bengal and Maharashtra. According to the Nation Crime Records Bureau, human trafficking in 2015 increased by 38.7% from the previous year.

The study has found that managers requested between Rs 250 to Rs 3,300 for services from a 17-year-old, with an average of Rs 1,555. “It is unclear, however, how much the girls themselves would receive of this payment for services. For the three 16-year-olds (interviewed for the study), managers charged Rs 500, 800, and 3,200 in which the girls would receive less than half’’.