Experts discuss ways to curb human trafficking

JUDICIAL COLLOQUIUM HELD AT CHANDIGARH - SEEN HERE ARE SHRI JASBIR SINGH AA HIGCTING CHIEF JUSTICE PUNJAB AND HARYANA COURT, JUSTICE MITTAL - JUDGE , PUNJAB AND HARYANA HIGH COURT , MS BHAMATI ADDL SECRETARY - MINISTRY OF HOME AFFAIRS , MS SHANTA SINHA - CHAIRPERSON NCPCR , SHRI SHARATCHANDRA MEMBER SECRETARY NALSA, MR RAVI KANT PRESIDENT SHAKTI VAHINI

JUDICIAL COLLOQUIUM HELD AT CHANDIGARH – SEEN HERE ARE SHRI JASBIR SINGH AA HIGCTING CHIEF JUSTICE PUNJAB AND HARYANA COURT, JUSTICE MITTAL – JUDGE , PUNJAB AND HARYANA HIGH COURT , MS BHAMATI ADDL SECRETARY – MINISTRY OF HOME AFFAIRS , MS SHANTA SINHA – CHAIRPERSON NCPCR , SHRI SHARATCHANDRA MEMBER SECRETARY NALSA, MR RAVI KANT PRESIDENT SHAKTI VAHINI

INDIA EXPRESS

A Colloquium on human trafficking was organised on Sunday by the state legal services authorities of Punjab, Haryana and UT Chandigarh, in collaboration with the governments of Punjab and Haryana. The event was held at the Chandigarh Judicial Academy and was sponsored by the Union Ministry of Home Affairs.

Eminent speakers and chief guest, Jasbir Singh, Acting Chief Justice of the Punjab and Haryana High Court, discussed concerns related to human trafficking and the possible ways to curb it. Speaking on the occasion, P M Nair, special Director General of CRPF, explained the dimensions, challenges and existing responses on human trafficking. He presented a documentary made by the United Nations, with him as the project head, featuring real life cases of children who were traded for money and appeals made by Bollywood actors like Amitabh Bachchan, John Abraham and Preity Zinta to stop human trafficking.

Shanta Sinha, Chairperson of the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR) and Ravi Kant, President of Sakti Vahini, a Non Governmental Organisation, emphasized that the present legal framework against human trafficking has loopholes and more stringent laws need to be developed. Sinha said that about 80 percent of the present child labour force is employed in the agricultural sector as only 65 procedures are prohibited by the Child Labour Act in India. This leads to more trafficking of children for agricultural sector and work at home based units. Ravi Kant applauded the recent order passed by the Punjab and Haryana High Court to register FIRs for all missing children.

U Sarathchandran, member, Secretary of National Legal Services Authority, New Delhi, elucidated the role of the judiciary along with cases of human trafficking from Bihar and Madhya Pradesh, which were caught and duly handled by the judicial authorities. Justice Roshan Dalvi of Mumbai High Court and Swati Chauhan, Judge at the Family Court, Mumbai, threw light on the legal provisions against trafficking and protection of victims alongwith the prosecution of traffickers.

In his address, Acting Chief Justice of the Punjab and Haryana High court, Jasbir Singh, said, “It is shameful that human beings are treated as commodities today. It’s a gross disruption in moral values and righteousness”. He added that in this regard there is a need to follow the principle of four Ps- prohibition, prevention, prosecution and partnership.

The colloquium was attended by a gathering of more than 500 jurists and other members of the judicial fraternity.

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Colloquium On Human Trafficking At Chandigarh Judicial Academy

THE INDIA POST

Chandigarh, July 28- A colloquium on Human Trafficking  is being organized by State Legal Services Authorities of  Haryana, Punjab and Union Territory of  Chandigarh, in collaboration with Governments of Haryana and Punjab at Chandigarh Judicial Academy, here on July 29 at 9:30 a.m.

While stating this here today, an official spokesman said that Dr. P. M. Nair, Special Director General, CRPF would speak on Dimensions Challenges and existing responses on Human Trafficking, Prof. Shantha Sinha, Chairperson, National Commission for Protection of Child Rights, New Delhi would speak on Laws and Procedures on Trafficking for Forced Labour, including Child Labour, Ms. Swati Chauhan, Judge, Family Court, Mumbai would speak on Adjudication of  Sexual Offences, Mr. Ravi Kant, President, Shakti Vahini , a NGO,  would speak on Rescue, Rehabilitation and Reintegration of trafficked survivors and Mr. Justice Roshan Daivi, Judge, Mumbai High Court would speak on Laws relating to Sexual Exploitation.

Human Trafficking curse to humanity: Justice Jasbir Singh

Sunday, July 29, 2012 – 16:45
CHANDIGARH: The State Legal Services Authorities of Punjab, Haryana and U.T. Chandigarh, in collaboration with Governments of Punjab and Haryana, have organized a ‘Judicial Colloquium on Human Trafficking’ at Chandigarh Judicial Academy, here today.
There was unison amongst all delegates for bringing about a close co-ordination amongst police and civil administration, civil society and NGOs working in this area to emphatically curb the menace of human trafficking, which has caused a shameful stint on Indian society. It was also arrived at that judiciary has a decisive role to play in checking this inhuman practice through its pro-active role by taking the matter more seriously and to response swiftly.
Hon’ble Acting Chief Justice, Punjab and Haryana High Court Mr. Jasbir Singh formally inaugurated the conference by lighting a lamp. Delivering a keynote address, he stressed on the need of reconstructing moral values and ethics. He appealed civil societies to get involved in addressing the challenges of human trafficking along with government machineries. Mr. Justice also exhorted religious bodies to recognize their role in preserving the moral values. He dared all the police and civil administrative officers to take it as challenging task to eradicate human trafficking, which has been making inroads into our socio-economic frame work.
Mr. Justice Satish Kumar Mittal, Judge, Punjab and Haryana High Court cum Executive Chairman, Haryana State Legal Services Authority believed that human trafficking is more a economical problem than a political. He pointed out the reason behind the human trafficking, which mainly ended up in flesh trade, human organ smuggling, bonded and child labour. Justice Mittal said that around 2 lacs people were being trafficked per year, among them 60 per cent were the girls. Ms. Justice Roshan Dalvi, Judge, Mumbai High Court, in her address stressed on the need of several short term and long term measures to educate all the sections of the society. She also pointed out that poverty alleviation measures would also help in combating human trafficking in the long run.
In this Judicial Colloquium, District, Police, Legal and Civil administrative officers of Punjab and Haryana were also participating through video conferencing.

National Commission for Protection of Child Rights team to publish report on rampant trafficking in West Bengal

English: South 24 Parganas district, West Beng...

TIMES OF INDIA

NEW DELHI: A team from the National Commission for Protection of Child Rights(NCPCR) which had toured Bengal in view of the rising number of missing children in the state is busy preparing the final report which is expected to be tabled next week. The move comes in the midst of data recently published by NCRB stating that the state ranks poorly when it comes to tackle trafficking. The three member delegation consisting of – Vinod Kumar Tikoo, Shaista Khan, senior consultant, NCPCR and Debayani Bose, media consultant NCPCR reached Kolkata last week to have a dialogue with the West Bengal administration on Child Protection issues. The NGO Shakti Vahini helped the team in Kolkata with the purpose of linking the source and destination of the human trafficking areas.

A NCPCR official said that the The Anti Human Trafficking Units of West Bengal should play the pro active role in fighting this social evil. “Meetings were organized with the NGOs working there and also with the district administration of the concerned districts. The delegation will also had a dialogue with the concerned stakeholders of child protection like medical department, education department and police,” said the official.

The delegation visited the affected districts like South 24 Parganas, Malda and Murshidabad which are most prone to child trafficking. They also met V V Thambi, DGP, CID (West Bengal) and discuss about the status of child trafficking in West Bengal. The meeting focused on the NGO-AHTU partnership of source and destination. As a part of this visit, the team also attended a programme organized by Salaap NGO in which documents related to child protection were released and also discussion on Reintegration of trafficked children took place. According to Rishi Kant of Shakti Vahini the visit is very important considering the state as most trafficked prone area and a strategy needs to be developed to combat the menace.

Three arrested for trafficking

TIMES OF INDIA

New Delhi: Three people have been arrested for allegedly trafficking a woman from Mangolpuriin Outer Delhi. The victim has been rescued, said police. The accused have been identified as Kamla (40), Jeet Ram (54) and Rajbir (32). Kamla was arrested after the victim’s father filed a complaint. Cops said during interrogation, Kamla said on April 20, she and one Vijay offered the victim work at a wedding venue in Palwal (Haryana) for two days.

After the victim agreed, they took her to Palwal. They stayed at Jeet Ram’s house and the next day he sold the woman to one Rajbir for Rs 30,000. A raid was conducted and the victim rescued from Rajbir’s house, who was arrested.

We are not encouraging sex workers, Supreme Court clarifies

NATIONAL LEGAL RESEARCH DESK

NEW DELHI: The Supreme Court today modified one of its order on welfare and rehabilitation of sex workers on the Centre’s submissions that the last year’s order gave an impression that it seeks to legalize prostitution. Allaying the Centre’s fears that it was giving its seal of approval to prostitution, a special bench of justices Altamas Kabir and Gyan Sudha Misra modified its earlier order, saying “the modification shall not be construed that by this order any encouragement is being given to prostitution.”

Modifying its earlier order, the bench clarified that it would only examine the “conditions conducive for sex workers to work with dignity in accordance with provisions of Article 21 of the Constitution.” It added it was keen that sex workers should be given opportunity to avail rehabilitation measures of the government and other agencies for them.While adjudicating a petition for rehabilitation of former sex workers, the apex court had on July 19, 2011 framed three terms of reference.

Appointing a broad-based panel to look into the matter, the apex court by its July 2011 order had formulated three questions related to prevention of trafficking, rehabilitation of sex workers who wish to leave the sex work and “conditions conducive for sex workers who wish to continue working as sex workers with dignity.”On the Centre’s submission that the third term gave an impression that prostitution has been sought to be legalised, the apex court modified it to read as “conducive for sex workers to live with dignity in accordance with the provisions of Article 21 of the Constitution”.

“The above modification shall not be construed that by this order any encouragement is being given to prostitution,” the bench added. Justice Sudha also observed, “While we do not wish to encourage sex trade we would emphasise rehabilitation of sex workers for which we had taken the issue. “We wish to add although the sex workers have right to live with dignity. There has to be collective endeavours by courts and sex workers to give up flesh trade in case they are given alternative platform on employment.”

KIDS BELONG IN SCHOOL NOT KITCHEN

MALLICA JOSHI IN THE HINDUSTAN TIMES

Talk to residents who have hired an underage domestic help and you will soon see them clamouring to justify their actions. “At least she is getting three square meals here. She would have died in her village”, “We treat her very well. We give her new clothes twice a year and also let her watch television. She wouldn’t get these things at home”, and “We take her along for all our vacations. Last year we took her to Singapore in an airplane”.

These are the usual protestations you would hear from those trying to justify their crime. “What most of these people do not understand, or choose to ignore, is that the girl should be in school, just like their children are. She should get the emotional support of her family and should be given the right to make informed choices,” said Rishi Kant, member, Shakti Vahini, an NGO.

What needs to change in the mindset of the middle and upper-middle class which is the primary employer of child domestic workers. Hindustan Times spoke to a number of families who have employed children to work in their homes most of these families have young children of their own. In fact the child domestic workers are hired primarily to take care of these children. But none of these families thought what they were doing was illegal.

“Unless this mindset does not change and the laws don’t become stricter, trafficking is here to stay,” Kant added.